How Far will Bass Migrate to spawn? Bass Articles Bass Fishing Articles
Anglerworld.com BFHP
Bass Articles

Fishing Reports
BFHP Articles
Fishing News
Tournaments
Fishing Tactics
Places to Fish
Rods/Reels
Electronics
Boats/Motors
Boat Ramp Stories
Trailers/Towing
Props
Other Topics
Other Fishing Topics
Swap/Sell
Swap/Sell (no boats)
Props 4 Sale

Boats 4 Sale
Saltwater Fishing
Non-Fishing
Striped Bass
Lure Making
More Politics
Co-Anglers

How Far will Bass Migrate to spawn?

The longer a move, the less likely it is to occur. Yet, there are exceptions to such rules in nature.


The seasonal migration of bass has been poorly studied, primarily because continuous 24/7365 tracking studies have not been made, or have been so expensive in both in time and money that only a few bass were tracked. The studies have revealed that daily migrations from deep water to shallows and returns are not the usual behavior pattern of bass. Black bass tend to stay at nearly constant depths, only briefly moving shallower a few feet to feed. Longer upward moves require quick dashes to the surface and quick returns to re-establish hydrostatic equilibrium. Feeding moves are generally only a few hundred yards at most, and tend to run parallel to bottom contours rather than up and down across contours.


Still, anglers encounter what appear to be major pre- and post-spawn migrations to and from shallow spawning areas. So then we are left with speculations or hypotheses concerning deep water bass found far from spawning areas.


One explanation of deep water home ranges for bass is that during the initial inundation of reservoirs, bass learn to live and spawn in areas that were shallow but became deep over time. Habitual routes to shallows are forced to become longer and longer as the reservoir expands. These deep fish likely peter-out as deep fishing attrition, natural mortality, and the lesser quality of the deep habitats gradually eliminates them. Old reservoirs tend to hold fewer deep bass.


Another possibility involves population pressure. There are almost always too many bass fry compared to the ability of the shallow spawning areas to provide adequate food. Natural mortality thins the ranks, but so does a tendency of fry and fingerling schools to split up and widen the hunting/search areas. When population pressure is particularly strong, this forces bass to migrate far away and to live in more marginal,less ideal, habitats. One such habitat is the deep water.


All of the aquatic food chain start at the surface. Sunlight is necessary to provide the phytoplankton,and thus start the chain. Deeper water only gets the food that dies and sink downward. There is usually less food down deep, although special current concentrations and mobile foods can produce build-ups that may support decent populations of deep food like fly larvae (bluegill food) and crayfish feeding on collected detritus.


Some deep fish therefore find suitable, even more than adequate, living habitats. They may have long lives if not discovered by anglers. For these fish, along trips to the spawning grounds are likely worthwhile.


by Ralph Manns


     

    Advertising/Sponsor Information
    Subscriptions
    Register to post messages and reports

    7-11-2013

    Subscribers don't receive these ads


    Fishing Reports
    BFHP Articles
    Fishing News
    Upcoming Events
    Rally Page
    BFHP Surveys
    Fishing Tactics
    Places to Fish
    Rods/Reels
    Electronics
    Other Topics
    Product Evaluations

    Boats/Motors
    Boat Ramp Stories
    Trailers & Towing
    Boats For Sale
    Tournament Tactics
    Striped Bass

    Swap/Sell
    Clubs 
    Fly Fishing
    Hunting
    Props
    Fish4
    Saltwater Fishing
    Non-Fishing
    Political Hook
    Tall Tales, Fiction & Legend
    Complete Listing of Boards
    Copyright © WMI, Inc. 1995-2014. All rights reserved.
    This message board created and maintained by: WebMasters International, Inc. (WMI) address mail to wmi@wmi.org

    WMI disclaimer
    Privacy Statement

    Google